Katherine Rundell  is a Fellow in English Literature at All Souls College in Oxford, and the author of five prize-winning novels for children. She has written for, among others, The London Review of Books, The TLS, Times, Guardian, Telegraph and BBC Radio 4. In her spare time, she is learning, very slowly, to fly a plane.    “The Alpine Fellowship allows people who would never meet, working in fields that rarely collide, to share ideas, expertise and knowledge; something which, in an increasingly polarised world, we need more than ever. It’s a real privilege to be part of it: it feels galvanic.”

Katherine Rundell is a Fellow in English Literature at All Souls College in Oxford, and the author of five prize-winning novels for children. She has written for, among others, The London Review of Books, The TLS, Times, Guardian, Telegraph and BBC Radio 4. In her spare time, she is learning, very slowly, to fly a plane.

“The Alpine Fellowship allows people who would never meet, working in fields that rarely collide, to share ideas, expertise and knowledge; something which, in an increasingly polarised world, we need more than ever. It’s a real privilege to be part of it: it feels galvanic.”

  Andrew Huddleston  is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at Birkbeck, University of London. He studied at Brown University, Pembroke College, Cambridge, and Princeton University. Prior to coming to Birkbeck, he was a Fellow at Exeter College, Oxford. He specializes in German philosophy (esp. Nietzsche), as well as in aesthetics, ethics, and social philosophy. He has published a number of articles on these topics, and his book  Nietzsche on the Decadence and Flourishing of Culture  is forthcoming with Oxford University Press.     "The Alpine Fellowship, to me, is a kind of salon for the 21st century. Artists, academics, writers, musicians, and other kindred spirits come together in a beautiful setting to reflect on the theme of that year.The questions discussed are at once both timely and enduring, and the conversation and company highly stimulating."

Andrew Huddleston is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at Birkbeck, University of London. He studied at Brown University, Pembroke College, Cambridge, and Princeton University. Prior to coming to Birkbeck, he was a Fellow at Exeter College, Oxford. He specializes in German philosophy (esp. Nietzsche), as well as in aesthetics, ethics, and social philosophy. He has published a number of articles on these topics, and his book Nietzsche on the Decadence and Flourishing of Culture is forthcoming with Oxford University Press.

"The Alpine Fellowship, to me, is a kind of salon for the 21st century. Artists, academics, writers, musicians, and other kindred spirits come together in a beautiful setting to reflect on the theme of that year.The questions discussed are at once both timely and enduring, and the conversation and company highly stimulating."

  Nell Leyshon  is an award-winning playwright and novelist. Her first novel, Black Dirt, was long-listed for the Orange Prize and The Colour of Milk has been published worldwide. Her plays include Comfort me with Apples, which won an Evening Standard Award, and Bedlam, the first play written by a woman to be performed at Shakespeare’s Globe. Nell also writes for BBC Radio 3 and 4, and her first radio play, Milk, won the Richard Imison Award. She taught creative writing for many years with marginalised communities, and is a trustee of the Globe Theatre.   “Since returning to study as a mature student, I noticed a lack of conversation between creatives and academics. This always surprised me, particularly in my field of English Literature; after all, we both engage with the same texts. The Alpine Fellowship is a rare and exciting opportunity to have those conversations in a supportive, non-competitive environment, away from institutions. The Fellowship is also fast becoming an effective and passionate supporter of emerging writers and visual artists, and young academics.”

Nell Leyshon is an award-winning playwright and novelist. Her first novel, Black Dirt, was long-listed for the Orange Prize and The Colour of Milk has been published worldwide. Her plays include Comfort me with Apples, which won an Evening Standard Award, and Bedlam, the first play written by a woman to be performed at Shakespeare’s Globe. Nell also writes for BBC Radio 3 and 4, and her first radio play, Milk, won the Richard Imison Award. She taught creative writing for many years with marginalised communities, and is a trustee of the Globe Theatre.

“Since returning to study as a mature student, I noticed a lack of conversation between creatives and academics. This always surprised me, particularly in my field of English Literature; after all, we both engage with the same texts. The Alpine Fellowship is a rare and exciting opportunity to have those conversations in a supportive, non-competitive environment, away from institutions. The Fellowship is also fast becoming an effective and passionate supporter of emerging writers and visual artists, and young academics.”


  Mike Lesslie  is a highly sought-after screenwriter and playwright. He has written scripts for  Macbeth , which was directed by Justin Kurzel and premiered in competition at Cannes, and  The Little Drummer Girl , which was directed by the legendary Park Chan-Wook and nominated for awards all over the world. He has had theatre work staged at the Royal National Theatre, in the West End and translated into many languages, and worked with practitioners from Kathryn Bigelow to Errol Morris, Marion Cotillard to Riz Ahmed. Lesslie also produces through his company Storyteller Productions, which creates top-range international film and TV.

Mike Lesslie is a highly sought-after screenwriter and playwright. He has written scripts for Macbeth, which was directed by Justin Kurzel and premiered in competition at Cannes, and The Little Drummer Girl, which was directed by the legendary Park Chan-Wook and nominated for awards all over the world. He has had theatre work staged at the Royal National Theatre, in the West End and translated into many languages, and worked with practitioners from Kathryn Bigelow to Errol Morris, Marion Cotillard to Riz Ahmed. Lesslie also produces through his company Storyteller Productions, which creates top-range international film and TV.

  Iain Martin  is a commentator and author. He writes a weekly column for The Times of London, and edits Reaction - www.reaction.life - the site he founded in 2016 providing analysis on politics, economics and culture from leading writers. A former editor of The Scotsman, he has also been a senior executive on newspapers including The Wall Street Journal and the Daily Telegraph. He is the author of Making it Happen: RBS, Fred Goodwin and the men who blew up the British economy (2013) and Crash Bang Wallop: the inside story of a financial revolution that changed the world (2016). He lives in London.    “In an era of information overload, social media dysfunction, and attention deficit disorder, the Alpine Fellowship stands out as an organisation determined to pursue a much more thoughtful and considered approach to culture. It identifies and supports emerging talent across a range of disciplines, and at its gatherings brings together new and established voices to discuss the major themes that matter. Personally, I have found the resulting conversations challenging in the best sense of the word and highly stimulating. The lectures and panel discussions are of the highest quality. That's why I am delighted to support the valuable work of the Alpine Fellowship."

Iain Martin is a commentator and author. He writes a weekly column for The Times of London, and edits Reaction - www.reaction.life - the site he founded in 2016 providing analysis on politics, economics and culture from leading writers. A former editor of The Scotsman, he has also been a senior executive on newspapers including The Wall Street Journal and the Daily Telegraph. He is the author of Making it Happen: RBS, Fred Goodwin and the men who blew up the British economy (2013) and Crash Bang Wallop: the inside story of a financial revolution that changed the world (2016). He lives in London.

“In an era of information overload, social media dysfunction, and attention deficit disorder, the Alpine Fellowship stands out as an organisation determined to pursue a much more thoughtful and considered approach to culture. It identifies and supports emerging talent across a range of disciplines, and at its gatherings brings together new and established voices to discuss the major themes that matter. Personally, I have found the resulting conversations challenging in the best sense of the word and highly stimulating. The lectures and panel discussions are of the highest quality. That's why I am delighted to support the valuable work of the Alpine Fellowship."

  Sukhdev Sandhu  directs the Colloquium for Unpopular Culture at New York University. A former Critic of the Year at the British Press Awards, his books include the prize-winning Night Haunts (2007) and Other Musics (2016). He writes for Bidoun, The Wire and The Guardian, makes radio documentaries for the BBC, and runs the Texte and Töne publishing imprint.

Sukhdev Sandhu directs the Colloquium for Unpopular Culture at New York University. A former Critic of the Year at the British Press Awards, his books include the prize-winning Night Haunts (2007) and Other Musics (2016). He writes for Bidoun, The Wire and The Guardian, makes radio documentaries for the BBC, and runs the Texte and Töne publishing imprint.